At the end of his Wednesday General Audience address, Pope Francis spoke on January 27th being International Holocaust Remembrance Day, International Holocaust Remembrance Day, the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

“Today we commemorate the victims of the Holocaust and all those persecuted and deported by the Nazi regime. We commemorate the victims of the Holocaust and all those persecuted and deported by the Nazi regime. To remember is an expression of humanity. Remembrance is a sign of civilization. To remember is a condition for a better future of peace and fraternity. Remembrance also means being careful because these things can happen again, starting with ideological proposals that are intended to save a people and end up destroying a people and humanity. Be aware of how this road of death, extermination, and brutality began.”

Pope Francis spoke similarly last year in observing the day of remembrance, when he called for all to “set aside a moment of prayer and recollection, saying in our hearts: never again!”

“In the face of this immense tragedy indifference is not admissible and memory is due.”

In 2016, Pope Francis became the third pope to visit Auschwitz, following in the footsteps of Popes Saint John Paul II and Benedict XVI. A completely silent visit, he spoke before entering: “I would like to go to that place of horror without speeches, without crowds — only the few people necessary. Alone, enter, pray. And may the Lord give me the grace to cry.”

Love uCATHOLIC?
Get our inspiring content delivered to your inbox every morning - FREE!

Comments

3 COMMENTS

  1. Thus wrote Mahatma Gandhi: “The first principal of non-violent action is that of non-cooperation with everything humiliating.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here