Saint Wolfgang

Saint Wolfgang of Regensburg (c. 934 – October 31, 994) was bishop of Regensburg in Bavaria from Christmas 972 until his death. He is regarded as one of the three great German saints of the 10th century

Saint Marcellus the Centurion

It is believed that Saint Marcellus was born in Arzas of Galicia. A brave pagan, he entered upon the career of arms, hoping to gain a large fortune. He married a young lady named Nona and they were blessed with twelve children. Saint Marcellus was a valorous solider and was promoted to the charge of centurion; he had no thought for any advancement except the sort pertaining to his military life, when he heard the fervent preaching of a holy bishop of the church of Leon. He was converted with his entire family to the Christian religion. All of them except his wife would soon give their blood in honor of their Faith.

The Martyrs of Douai

A group of 160 priests trained at the English College of Douai, in France. They were martyred in England and Wales during the century following the foundation of the famed college by Cardinal William Allen in 1568. All perished at the hands of English authorities while laboring to reconvert the island. Eighty alumni of Douai were beatified in 1929.

Saint Simon the Zealot, Apostle

St Simon is surnamed the Zealot, to distinguish him from St. Peter, and from St. Simeon, the brother of St. James the Less, and his successor in the see of Jerusalem. Many think that St. Simon was called the Zealot, before his coming to Christ, because he was one of that particular sect or party among the Jews called Zealots, from a singular zeal they possessed for the honor of God and the purity of religion.

Saint Jude Thaddaeus, Apostle

St. Jude, known as Thaddaeus, was a brother of St. James the Less, and a relative of Our Saviour. St. Jude was one of the 12 Apostles of Jesus. 

Ancient writers tell us that he preached the Gospel in Judea, Samaria, Idumaea, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Libya.

Saint Frumentius

The Apostle of Ethiopia. Called “Abuna” or “the father” of Ethiopia, sent to that land by St. Athanasius. According to a 4th century historian, who cites St. Frumentius' brother St. Aedesius as his authority, while still children Frumentius and Aedesius accompanied their uncle Metropius on a voyage to Ethiopia. When their ship stopped at one of the harbors of the Red Sea, the locals massacred the whole crew, with the exception of the two boys, who were taken as slaves to the King of Aksum.

Pope Saint Evaristus

Pope Saint Evaristus was the fifth pope, holding office from circa 97 to 105. He was also known as Aristus. Little is known about Saint Evaristus.

Saints Crispin and Crispinian

Martyrs of the Early Church who were beheaded during the reign of Diocletian; the date of their execution is given as 25 October, 285 or 286. It is stated that they were brothers, but the fact has not been positively proved. The legend relates that they were Romans of distinguished descent who went as missionaries of the Christian Faith to Gaul and chose Soissons as their field of labour. In imitation of St. Paul they worked with their hands, making shoes, and earned enough by their trade to support themselves and also to aid the poor.

Saint Anthony Mary Claret

St. Anthony Mary (1807–1870) was a Catalan Archbishop and missionary, and was confessor of Isabella II of Spain. Founder of the Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (The Claretians)

Saint John of Capistrano

Saint John of Capistrano (1386 – 1456) was a Franciscan priest from Italy. Famous as a preacher and theologian, he earned himself the nickname 'the Soldier Saint' when in 1456 at age 70 he led a crusade against the invading Ottoman Empire at the siege of Belgrade with the Hungarian military commander John Hunyadi. He is the patron saint of jurists and military chaplains

Follow uCatholic

1,025,231FansLike
55,014FollowersFollow
8,587FollowersFollow
20,900SubscribersSubscribe