Saint Frumentius

The Apostle of Ethiopia. Called “Abuna” or “the father” of Ethiopia, sent to that land by St. Athanasius. According to a 4th century historian, who cites St. Frumentius' brother St. Aedesius as his authority, while still children Frumentius and Aedesius accompanied their uncle Metropius on a voyage to Ethiopia. When their ship stopped at one of the harbors of the Red Sea, the locals massacred the whole crew, with the exception of the two boys, who were taken as slaves to the King of Aksum.

Pope Saint Evaristus

Pope Saint Evaristus was the fifth pope, holding office from circa 97 to 105. He was also known as Aristus. Little is known about Saint Evaristus.

Saints Crispin and Crispinian

Martyrs of the Early Church who were beheaded during the reign of Diocletian; the date of their execution is given as 25 October, 285 or 286. It is stated that they were brothers, but the fact has not been positively proved. The legend relates that they were Romans of distinguished descent who went as missionaries of the Christian Faith to Gaul and chose Soissons as their field of labour. In imitation of St. Paul they worked with their hands, making shoes, and earned enough by their trade to support themselves and also to aid the poor.

Saint Anthony Mary Claret

St. Anthony Mary (1807–1870) was a Catalan Archbishop and missionary, and was confessor of Isabella II of Spain. Founder of the Missionary Sons of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (The Claretians)

Saint John of Capistrano

Saint John of Capistrano (1386 – 1456) was a Franciscan priest from Italy. Famous as a preacher and theologian, he earned himself the nickname 'the Soldier Saint' when in 1456 at age 70 he led a crusade against the invading Ottoman Empire at the siege of Belgrade with the Hungarian military commander John Hunyadi. He is the patron saint of jurists and military chaplains

Saint Pope John Paul II

Pope Saint John Paul II born Karol Józef Wojtyła; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005), reigned as Pope from 16 October 1978 to his death in 2005

Saint Hilarion

Saint Hilarion (291–371) was an anchorite who spent most of his life in the desert according to the example of Saint Anthony of Egypt. He was born in a village called Tabatha, to the south of Gaza, his parents being idolaters. He was sent by them to Alexandria to study, where, being brought to the knowledge of the Christian faith, he was baptized when he was about fifteen.

Saint Paul of the Cross

Saint Paul of the Cross originally named Paolo Francesco Danei, was born on 3 January 1694, in the town of Ovada, Piedmont, between Turin and Genoa in the Duchy of Savoy in northern Italy. He is considered to be among the greatest Catholic mystics of the eighteenth century.

The North American Martyrs

The North American Martyrs, also known as the Canadian Martyrs or the Martyrs of New France, were eight Jesuit missionaries from Sainte-Marie among the Hurons, who were martyred in the mid-17th century in Canada, in what are now southern Ontario and upstate New York. The Martyrs are St. Jean de Brébeuf (1649), St. Noël Chabanel (1649), St. Antoine Daniel (1648), St. Charles Garnier (1649), St. René Goupil (1642), St. Isaac Jogues (1646), St. Jean de Lalande (1646), and St. Gabriel Lalemant (1649).[1]

Saint Luke

Saint Luke's authorship of the Third Gospel has not been seriously disputed. Nor has the attribution of the Acts of the Apostles to him been questioned. Luke's Gospel is clearly related to the Gospels of St. Mark and St. Matthew both in content and in structure; all three drew on a common source. St. Luke, however, used a second source unknown to either St. Matthew or St. Mark. Scholars have surmised that this source may have been Mary, the mother of Jesus, and her closest friends, all of whom knew Jesus intimately.

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